Forum Posts

Barry Osborne
Mar 04, 2022
In General Discussions
However, we must remember we are all individuals and all have the right to express our opinions and there is a good chance that the opinions will vary greatly between us all. You may feel very strongly about a certain situation but it is not necessary the case that the one person's opinion rules what all the members will do. The first example of this was the Covid situation where some members believed that we should close down the tennis and not play. However, there were a number of members who wanted to play and so we did play right through the lockdowns virtually. Now I had a situation this week where one member had very strong feelings regarding playing tennis this week and I received the following email, which was: "Barry, I do not agree with the encouragement of unnecessary travel to play tennis. There were ambulances at Ridley Street having to walk trolleys & patients over to Wesley. Elders moving spouses in wheelchairs for dialysis. People walking over the train station with food, pharmacy products for the hospital. Surely, the tennis community should be helping not interfering." I think it is admirable that our members have strong feelings about these situations, but again decisions have to be made for the group as a whole. My immediate, response was: "I understand your views and appreciate what you are doing. On Monday when I cancelled, I immediately had a member on the line telling me the courts were good to play. I have members who are locked in their homes and have no one to talk to and the last few days must have been very traumatic for a lot of our members. So just letting them stay in their own sheltered area with little contact is exactly what I am trying not to achieve. " But with the development of the group, it is now the responsibility of running the group by a Steering Committee which is made up of 5 members and not just me alone. You will hear more about the Steering Committee in the very near future. The Steering Committee response to this email was: "Our view: Members are welcome to do as they please and say most things they wish. If they choose not to play as a courtesy, then fine. If they choose to help with the Wesley, great! They can encourage others to do the same, as and if they wish – at least they’re informed. If they were/are likely to become a transport nuisance, I’d have more sympathy for the proposal - to keep traffic away from the hospital (or anywhere else it creates a nuisance)….We are not convinced they will be There are many hours in the week – people can choose to help whomever they wish during those times. If they wish to ignore doing some social good or if they wish to play tennis alongside doing some social good, then that’s their choice. As we highlight, playing tennis or seeing other people meets some mental health and fitness needs for a mix of members. So for us and the group, tennis proceeded. YOUR COMMENTS WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.
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Barry Osborne
Oct 10, 2021
In General Discussions
This has been written by our Jac Carson I thought your 'heart' felt comments about active aging and those calcium cardiac scores was worthwhile.....and further to all my cajoling of late re defibrillators there's been a very recent instance, with a connection to our group, which is tennis related .....and I believe, most telling. You see, I came to our group, then run by Ray Bicknell and John Long at the UQ courts, after leaving Tatts Racqueteers. Tatts Tennis had received an entreaty from the UQ group, for anyone wanting extra tennis, to call in for a game. As I had just resigned from Tattersalls Club, it was most timely. I don't recall an Eddie Burke, from those days, but he said he remembered me from a later social function circa 2005/6 (and so he's sharper than me, and a sharper dresser too...see pic) but some of our Toowong members may know of him or recognize others in the attached memento image (or from the email list) from this 50th Anniversary Tatts Tennis lunch held 29th of September...i.e. the week before last. Eddie is the fit looking guy in the electric blue suit, standing to my immediate right, on the far RHS of the pic. Apparently the next day he was saved, on the court by a defibrillator. The following advice explains: My fellow Racqueteers, While competing in the Peter Geraghty Memorial Doubles final yesterday, Eddie Burke collapsed on court and stopped breathing. Thanks to the rapid action of Michael Paramor and a Centre employee who administered CPR to him and applied the defibrilator several times, he regained life and was taken by the paramedics to hospital where he is resting comfortably. He rang me last night to apologise for giving us a scare, and said he will be staying in hospital for a few days to undergo tests. We wish him a speedy and complete recovery. With my compliments Adrian The good news is that Eddie has since had the big bypass op and is doing well. Yes, all a bit close to home and ever since then I keep seeing defibrillators, the first, only two days after the Tatts Lunch, mounted inside the West Toowong Bowls Club (yellow item in the pic below) where I attend a Toowong History Group meeting, and yesterday at the Coochiemudlo Island Isle of Coochie Golf Club where it hangs on the doors of a machinery shed beside the clubhouse. Refer two extra pics attached. Once again, it shouldn't come down to you but if you circulate this story you may strike responsive chord with others who know Eddie and or will get behind a move to have one installed at the Toowong State School Courts...and Rosalie?? Frankly, I've heard all the stuff about training and being sued but I reckon if they are automated and can save somebody's life they are worth serious investigation. jac
Active Aging needs Monitoring content media
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Barry Osborne
Nov 27, 2020
In General Discussions
Sent by Paul MacKenzie Below is a link to & a copy of a tribute/speech which Senator Santoro made to Walter (Wal) Sommer in the Senate on 10 Feb 2004 shortly after Wal was honoured with an Order of Australia award. A must read. https://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber/hansards/2004-02-10/0166;query=Id:%22chamber/hansards/2004-02-10/0000%22 We are all privileged to have known Walter.
Walter "Wally" Sommer content media
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Barry Osborne
Nov 21, 2020
Match Plays for Week Starting 13th Dec 2020 content media
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Barry Osborne
Nov 15, 2020
In General Discussions
Anna and I took Patsy (Anna's 88 year old Mum) out for Melbourne Cup Lunch at Hamilton the other week. However, the highlight of the afternoon, other than the magnificent race, was that Patsy won the best dressed lady against all the young ladies. It made our day.
Melbourne Cup Lunch content media
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Barry Osborne
Mar 02, 2020
In General Discussions
Hey Walter, I hope you just don't piss through the rails, I thought you were at a high quality place there where yellow snow is frowned upon.
"Best Toilet View in the World" says Walter. content media
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Barry Osborne
Mar 02, 2020
In General Discussions
Well we all know that Walter is pretty good at getting around the tennis court but he is not bad on the ski slopes as well. Just take a look at these pictures what a beautiful place.
Walter and Isobel in the Snowfields of Colorado content media
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Barry Osborne
Jan 17, 2020
In General Discussions
This is Bryan Cameron, better known by you as "Farmer or Squatter" Bryan, but to me I have come to know him as "Killer" Bryan. When I play with him, some of his shots are amazing and they are in fact killer shots. He often gets upset with himself for some of his mistakes but he seems to forget about the good shots he does. He has had a number of operations but will always get back to his most enjoyable tennis. Bryan has another big medical issue to fight which may affect his short term memory but as I have found playing with him of late, playing tennis is part of the long term memory. He may not remember the score, so what! He still knows how to kill those volleys at the net. Scoring can look after itself, but playing tennis is what we want from Bryan. He is a vital part of the group and a very long term member, with still plenty of games in the Old Dog yet. Sue sent me a note earlier in the month and said "Thank you Barry, and the rest of the OLD DOGS! for being so kind caring and supportive to the ageing ex farmer. I’m hoping he will continue to play next year ! Despite many protests after each game!" Well Sue, he will have no option, because even if he is not allowed to drive, I will be picking him up and taking him to tennis, and bringing him home again with a smile on his face, after he has done some more of his renowned killer shots. Toowong Tennis Old Dogs are more than just about tennis.
Toowong Tennis Old Dog, through and through. content media
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Barry Osborne
Dec 06, 2019
In General Discussions
But do you know the other side of Ian who loves to dress up for the enjoyment of the young kids. What a great Santa Claus he is. Good for you Ian. So if you would like to have a heart to heart talk with Ian, he is at Indooroopilly Shopping Town, his knee is waiting for you.
We all know Ian as a Top Old Dog content media
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Barry Osborne
Nov 13, 2019
In General Discussions
Rob Gilbert with his family enjoyed a great Social Event with many more fellow Brisbane families. It is called Pub Choir which originally started in Australia but is now a world wide phenomenon. It sure looks like fun. See if you can find him in this massive crowd.
One Old Dog enjoyed a good Sing-a-Long content media
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Barry Osborne
Nov 03, 2019
In General Discussions
Another great social event was held at Haig Rd Bistro which I am sure that all attendees will agree on. The Service was fantastic, the food was enticing and the venue had a real french feel about it. So for those who did not attend this time, make certain you attend the next one. To those who attended, thank you so much for support and I hope we can have another good event again in 2020. Here are the pictures, some are not so good, you can blame the photographer, ME. hard to beat this one, but we will try. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did, and thank you for your support, and especially the partners, in making it a great and enjoyable evening.
Social Event at Haig Rd Bistro content media
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Barry Osborne
Oct 27, 2019
In General Discussions
"No wonder I couldn't find any tennis courts here to have a hit, you can hardly breathe."says Col.
Col in Machu Picchu in South America content media
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Barry Osborne
Oct 27, 2019
In General Discussions
Hey Col, how is it at tennis?
Col found a new Pen Pal in South America content media
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Barry Osborne
Aug 29, 2019
In General Discussions
Darwin – Dundee Beach Start of the Adventure We began our journey on ANZAC Day so we had a great trip down the Bruce Highway to Brisbane Airport. Virgin check-in was easy and so was security, so we proceeded to the gate lounge where we had a cup of coffee and linked up with Rob Cameron and his father, Bryan, our companions for the trip. We then boarded the plane for the flight to Darwin which took almost four hours, but the time passed quickly. Our arrival in Darwin was quick and efficient and we soon had our bags and headed out to find our courtesy bus from Dundee Beach Fishing Charters. The driver, Mal, turned out to be the father of the owner of the business, Matt. Apparently, he and his wife came from their home in Victor Harbour, SA, to Dundee Beach for a significant portion of each year to help Matt. It was not long before we were loaded into the bus and on our way. The journey from the airport to Dundee Beach takes about 1 ¾ hours so we made ourselves comfortable. Before leaving the city we stopped at a bottle shop to buy some “supplies” – a carton or two of Great Northern Beer and a couple of bottles of wine. Here we discovered that in the NT you must produce a driver’s licence to buy takeaway alcohol. It was not the first local quirk we were to come across. Mal turned out to be a good driver and the journey was easy. The scenery was mainly scattered trees and undergrowth and a significant number of tall ants’ nests. It was also obvious that in the wet season there was a good bit of water around. There were floodways and significant drains in evidence everywhere. Our Stay Our arrival at Dundee Beach was pretty low key. The accommodation complex is basic, but comfortable. We had three rooms in our bungalow, each with two beds in it, and a shared shower and loo. Our hosts were happy for us to use all the bedrooms as there was not much cupboard space available in two of the bedrooms. So Dirk and I shared the one with the cupboards and Bryan and Rob the others, using the second beds as cupboards. The other main attractions were the swimming pool – with no safety fence, another quirk – and a central dining hall/TV room open on two sides but with highly effective insect screening. The latter was a great addition as the large mozzies were active, particularly after dusk. Our nights in this area were very enjoyable; the food was good and we enjoyed the company of the other guests. They comprised, in the main, two grandparents, Dan and Belinda, from Ipswich, and their two grandsons, Harry and Lachlan, who were lively and cheeky young boys. The grandfather managed a mining/refuse business in Ipswich and in yet another example of what a small world it is it turned out that Dirk had been involved in trying to sell the site some years before and would have undoubtedly come across Dan on visits to the mine as all visitors had to report to the Manager before being allowed to enter the site. I mentioned the food. It was prepared by the wife of one of the guides, her name was Lyn. She did an excellent job, arriving early in the morning to prepare a more than adequate breakfast comprising bacon, eggs and toast, plus some other offerings such as omelettes. Her evening meals were also great. We had a roast night, a fish night – including some fabulous, spicy mud crabs, and a beef night. She performed her magic on a bbq, in frying pans and deep friers, etc. In addition to the cooking she did all the washing up, etc. Breakfast was served promptly at 0615hrs and dinner at 1830hrs. I assume that she also prepared the lunch boxes which were sent out with us on our trips. They comprised different combinations each day but invariably there was some meat, a salad, a bread roll and some treats like small Snickers bars and so on. Oh, and I forgot to mention muesli bars and chips etc. Each day we would stop fishing for a while to enjoy lunch and a bit of shade from an awning on the boat erected for the purpose. What we could not eat we fed to the fish. Matt joined us for dinner every night, and usually shared a few beers and/or wines with us as well. The Fishing As I mentioned earlier, each day we would depart from our lodging promptly at 0645hrs. Mal would pick us up in the bus and drive us to the nearby boat launching ramp which was adjacent to the Dundee Beach Hotel. On arrival we would find the car park alive with other vehicles and boat trailers and groups of keen fishermen (and a few fisherwomen) as the sun began to rise. There we would meet Matt before climbing up into our boat to join the queue of boats waiting to be launched. The process actually went quite quickly and before long Mal was skilfully reversing us down the ramp and into the water. During our four days we went out on two different boats, but our guide was always Matt. He was obviously very knowledgeable about the area and fishing, and a keen fisherman himself. His boats were well-maintained, very suitable to the conditions, as comfortable as could be expected and equipped with good motors and lots of excellent technology. Aside from the usual GPS, he had sophisticated depth sounding and fish finding instruments and a fantastic GPS based electric “anchor” which he could control with a remote to keep us in one location without the use of a conventional anchor. On our four fishing days we had quite different experiences. I should begin by saying that to get to our main fishing grounds we had a high-speed trip of about 1 ½ hours. Once we arrived Matt set about locating us over one of his favourite spots before searching for a school of fish using his technology. On our first day we had a very exciting encounter with a school of jewfish. We were pulling them in almost as fast as we could get our lines into the water. Our second day was a bit of an anti-climax on which we caught nothing of any interest. Days three and four were much better and we caught a great selection of fish, plus one very large shark, and one fairly large stingray. There was much good natured competition about the fishing with the prize for the largest fish going to Bryan in the final moments of our last day when we fished the rock adjacent to the boat ramp. In addition to our open water fishing we ventured up several large rivers in search of barramundi et cetera. On these expeditions we saw many crocodiles of various sizes and even had one of them follow one of our lures almost to the side of the boat. On another day we tried crab fishing, putting out about half a dozen pots leaving them in place while we trolled or casted up and down the river. We did manage to catch half a dozen mud crabs but none of them was legal size. The weather was very kind to us during our visit. In the mornings we usually had a bit of a breeze which caused a light, sometimes medium, swell, but it usually dropped in the afternoon allowing us to travel at the boat’s top speed. We were also lucky in that we normally had a fair bit of cloud cover in the early part of the day. It was pretty warm once the clouds departed and we felt the full force of the sun. We fished or travelled full-time stopping briefly each day for a short time to enjoy the packed lunch which usually consisted of a mix of salad and meats and a couple of treats. Our fishing days usually ended with a boat trip home arriving at the ramp no later than 1600hrs. We would stay on board while Mal reversed the boat trailer down the ramp and Matt drove the boat onto the trailer. We would then help them with the unloading and cleaning of the fish. This latter operation took a little bit of time on the day we had a really big catch. On most afternoons we took advantage of the proximity of the Dundee Beach hotel and stopped to have a cold beer and admire the scenery. By this time the hotel was usually fairly busy with fishermen and fisherwomen returning from their day’s outing. The pub was also the local petrol station, so many of the skippers were also busy refuelling vehicles and boats. After a beer (or two) Mal would arrive with the bus and we would return to the complex. After a quick dip in the pool, we would shower, “dress” for dinner then head into the dining area for a predinner drink with the big screen TV in the background. My fellow fishermen had divided loyalties, some to the rugby and some to the AFL, so there was a bit of channel flicking between codes depending on who was playing and how the match was going. At 1830hrs Lyn would produce the meal and silence would descend on the table. Then Matt would join us and the wine, beer and conversation would flow. The oldies, such as myself and Bryan, would usually retire early but it was also usually not long before we were joined by the “boys”. As is always the case when having fun, time passed quickly and it was not long before we had to make our journey home. We returned from our last days fishing, had a shower and packed our bags to make way for 12 new arrivals, and moved out onto the deck to wait for Mal to arrive with the bus. We were to be joined on our trip back to Darwin by the aforementioned Dan, Belinda and their grandsons who were flying out at midnight. When Mal arrived, we hopped into the bus and waited, and waited. Dan then informed us that Belinda was dressing and drying her hair and would be with us soon. The word “soon” obviously has different meanings to different people and certainly Mal was finding Belinda’s version a bit frustrating as he had already done the four-hour round trip to Darwin to pick up the party of 12, and had another round trip to do before he could call his day complete. Belinda eventually arrived (after about 25 minutes, and without apology 😊) and we set off for Darwin. It was a pleasant and easy drive, especially for us passengers and before long we pulled into the Casino where we would be spending the night. We bade farewell to the Ipswich contingent who were heading directly to the airport for their midnight flight and went to the reception counter. The casino was a pretty impressive complex. We had a bit of a look around the casino itself which already had quite a few “customers” playing Keno, poker machines, blackjack et cetera. We decided to change and meet for dinner at the Chinese restaurant on site and had a very pleasant meal together before wandering back into the main casino. What goes on tour stays on tour, so I won’t reveal who played and won/lost against the incredibly skilful dealer. It had been a long day so eventually we filtered off to our rooms for a well-earned rest. Next morning, we decided to have breakfast in town and found a very pleasant café on the waterfront at Kitchener Bay. Rob then came up with the great idea of having a massage. We could not find anywhere to give us all a massage at the same time, so we split up and each found our own massage parlour. Coincidently, mine was called the Saigon. It was well set up and the masseuse was very good. We all finished about the same time, so we met up and decided to have lunch at nearby Cullen Bay. Again, we found a good restaurant overlooking the marina and had a very pleasant lunch. Time was again flying so we returned to the casino where we had left our luggage - and our frozen fish! - with the concierge. We did not want to take the fish out of the freezer before we had to, so we went for another wander around the casino floor which again had plenty of customers. The blackjack table at which some of us were playing was joined by a pretty formidable looking fellow who was obviously on some kind of “stimulant”. He was never still for a moment, jubilant when he won, annoyed when he lost. We left him to it and returned to reception to pick up our bits and pieces before loading into a maxi taxi for the trip to the airport. It took a bit of time to get our luggage, which included the four boxes of frozen fish, checked in. It is airline policy to wrap the boxes in plastic and then attach to them all sorts of labels such as “fragile” and “priority”. We eventually moved on to the security screening area where a very vigilant woman declared that my computer bag required to be searched. Having satisfied herself that I was not carrying anything illegal I was eventually allowed to join the others. It was not long before we loaded onto our aircraft. Dirk in his wisdom had booked us business class so we sat in Row 1 where we enjoyed good service, including a nice, warm meal of pulled lamb and veggies. Much better than the last meal Bronwyn I had had on Qantas. I managed a bit of a sleep and it was not long before our pilot announced that we were landing at Brisbane airport. We headed to baggage pickup and, after a bit of confusion as to where our boxes of fish would be delivered, we pick up our bags and the fish, farewelled each other, and Dirk and I headed to his car. In spite of the rain, we had a fantastic run home and arrived at Dirk’s where Bronwyn was waiting having picked up the children from school and taken them home to Dirk’s. Bronwyn I bade him farewell then headed home. Summary It was a great trip and both enjoyable and interesting. The NT is definitely a different place in a number of ways. I mentioned before that it had a few quirks. In addition to those previously mentioned I was surprised to hear that you do not need to have a licence to drive a boat, boats do not need to be registered, and there was no legal alcohol limit for the skipper of a boat. The country through which we drove was quite different with most of the trees being relatively small, and of course those ant hills I previously mentioned. It obviously suffered from substantial flooding in the wet season and the dry season would live up to its name. Bryan and Rob were great travelling companions and it was great to see Dirk and Rob continuing to enjoy the bonds they had formed at school and while jackarooing in Longreach. While on the water one day I heard some stories about their Longreach days the details of which have to stay on tour!!! Bryan and I had played tennis together for many years at Toowong, so we had a few reminiscences to share as well. All in all, it was a great trip and one that I shall remember fondly. My thanks to my travelling buddies for their companionship – and patience with my fishing skills which are very much inferior to theirs! Darwin Log from John Long and pictures supplied by John and Bryan. Thank you for sharing.
John Long and Bryan Cameron took their sons on a fishing trip to the Far North earlier this year. content media
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Barry Osborne
Aug 29, 2019
In General Discussions
Walter spent a few days at Altama Desert north of Santiago, he got tired of being wet and cold all the time so had to thaw out in a desert.
Walter did have a few days rest after Skiing content media
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Barry Osborne
Aug 29, 2019
In General Discussions
Check our Walter Helicopter skiing overseas and showing his class at skiing. So if it is not Tennis, boxing then it is skiing, nothing holds back our Walter. He arrives back tomorrow, but has already put his hand up for tennis this coming Monday. So he will be a little worn out on Monday, so it is okay if you want to run him around the court a bit so he knows he is home and now playing tennis.
Walter Sommer Helicopter Skiing content media
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Barry Osborne
May 23, 2019
In General Discussions
Steve Jobs was the co-founder , Chairman and CEO of Apple Corporation and died in 2011 , aged 56 , after losing his battle with Pancreatic Cancer . He posted the following observation just prior to his death . Do not delete without reading . Very profound and a realisation that only became obvious when he was confronted with his certain demise . The World's six best doctors ... worth reading--------- Steve Jobs Died a billionaire ( $10.2b ) at age 56. This is his final essay: I reached the pinnacle of success in the business world. In some others' eyes, my life is the epitome of success. However, aside from work, I have little joy. In the end, my wealth is only a fact of life that I am accustomed to. At this moment, lying on my bed and recalling my life, I realize that all the recognition and wealth that I took so much pride in have paled and become meaningless in the face of my death. You can employ someone to drive the car for you, make money for you but you cannot have someone bear your sickness for you. Material things lost can be found or replaced. But there is one thing that can never be found when it's lost - Life. Whichever stage in life you are in right now, with time, you will face the day when the curtain comes down. Treasure love for your family, love for your spouse, love for your friends. Treat yourself well and cherish others. As we grow older, and hopefully wiser, we realize that a $300 or a $30 watch both tell the same time. You will realize that your true inner happiness does not come from the material things of this world. Whether you fly first class or economy, if the plane goes down - you go down with it. Therefore, I hope you realize, when you have mates, buddies and old friends, brothers and sisters, who you chat with, laugh with, talk with, have sing songs with, talk about north-south-east-west or heaven and earth, that is true happiness! Don't educate your children to be rich. Educate them to be happy. So when they grow up they will know the value of things and not the price. Eat your food as your medicine, otherwise you have to eat medicine as your food. There is a big difference between a human being and being human. Only a few really understand it. You are loved when you are born. You will be loved when you die. In between, you have to manage! The six best doctors in the world are sunlight, rest, exercise, diet, self-confidence and friends. Maintain them in all stages and enjoy a healthy life."
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Barry Osborne
Apr 10, 2019
In General Discussions
The reason for it being such a special event, was because of the very special people who took the time to come along especially many of the partners, who sometimes feel secondary to the bl**** tennis. THANK YOU ALL FOR MAKING THIS EVENT SPECIAL.
What a Special Event it was? content media
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Barry Osborne
Mar 18, 2019
In General Discussions
Have you wondered where our good friend Richard is? He was a real regular at tennis up until just before our Christmas break. Always first to put his name down for the next week of tennis. He was also our fountain of knowledge on the rules of tennis and always had the score in the match. After the match on the 7th December, Richard said to me he will be off for a few months. I said "Gee, that is going to be a long trip", thinking he was going overseas again. He just said something about the wide blue yonder and didn't say anything more and regrettably now, I didn't push because I thought he didn't want to say anything more. So what a shock, I received when I sent him an SMS last week, "Hey Richard, are you back in Aussie land yet?" Imagine my surprise, when I received back immediately a reply from Richard "Never left, Barry. Off into the wide blue yonder meant it was possible I would not survive OHS. I did so. Thank you for your caring nature." My comment now to myself, is what caring nature? I should have picked up on it. Did any other member of our Old Dogs were aware of Richard going into hospital for a leaking mitral valve? Richard says now "I'm OK but have lost a lot of weight. Not gut fat only muscle mass. So will need a lot of conditioning before I resume facing the rocket serves and drop shots of all you Tennis Tyros." This week we will have Gary Malinas back after open heart surgery about 12 months ago and I know Gary had some real hard times there. But he is back. So Richard, you will be back I am sure, and we will be so happy to have you back. I cannot stress how important this website is for people like Richard and Gary. It is a way of communicating and feeding information to all of us and hopefully bringing a smile to their face when they are going through hard times. Hearing the stories about the members is a great way of making them still part of everything happening. There is one thing for certain, we will all have to go through these difficult times and it is a great support medium for us all, that our mates are there if needed and that we are thinking of them at their difficult time. Now I understand why Richard sent me some photos which I now share. Hey Richard, we are all thinking of you and can't wait to see you back on the courts. Sorry that you do not feel up to attend our Social Event, it would have been great to see you there.
Is Mateship at the Centre of our group? content media
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Barry Osborne
Mar 13, 2019
In General Discussions
So watch out everyone, Bryan is happy, and he will now be even more dangerous around the net with his light new weapon.
Bryan is happy with his new racquet content media
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